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20121201
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English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
. >> in the deadliest rampage at an elementary school in u.s. history, 20 kindergarten students and six staff members of the school are killed in newtown, connecticut. >> i have been at this for one- third of a century, and my sensibilities may not be of the average man, but this probably is the worst i have seen or the worst that i know of any of my colleagues have seen. >> the massacre occurred in newtown, connecticut, just miles from the national shooting sports foundation, the nation's second most powerful pro-gun lobby in the country after the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," de
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
night. we will have more on u.s. gun violence in the newtown massacre after headlines. egyptian voters headed to the polls on saturday in a referendum on a controversial draft constitution. according to unofficial preliminary results, the document passed the first round with 57% of the vote with the turnout of just 31%. a second round scheduled for this saturday in remaining areas. a coalition of human rights groups has called for revoked citing thousands of complaints of violations at the polls including a lack of full judicial supervision. at a news conference, the opposition national salvation front accused authorities of rigging the outcome. >> [indiscernible] >> we will have more from egypt with sharif abdel kouddous later in the broadcast. at least 25 people have reportedly been killed in the latest syrian government bombing of a palestinian refugee camp in damascus. the attack on the district comes amidst fears the syrian military is preparing a full on ground assault to displace rebels from their positions. during a visit to neighboring lebanon, the u.n. high commissioner for r
u.s. citizens from adopting russian children. the decision raising tensions between the two countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to punish russians for human rights violations. the ban will take effect on january 1st, that's really right away it would halt all new adoptions and end those already in progress. incredible. a lot of families in the process of adopting children in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. be
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
of skilled workers coming from our country, u.s. schools, u.s. workforces. that is the skills contact at the country could easily get behind and support. that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. some of the issues i heard talked about before critical to that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the earliest ages to make sure that under-represented groups are taking to science? why do we have to drop off at middle school around young women? what are the long-term strategy is? we have to attack this on all cylinders and have and all of the above the strategy. but while we are doing the long- term strategy to have a bit of supply of stem and high skilled workers, we should not take our eye off what we can do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics that came out of the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we had if you just ensured that you had a higher graduation rate among those who declared a stem major in their freshman year.
states during an interview with nbc news. president karzai blamed u.s. and nato forces for some of the insecurity in his country. he says he doesn't like the act that hundreds of prisoners are still being helled from the country and he signed that back in march with the president obama. he says he will not sign any more agreements with the u.s. until those prisoners are transferred. >>> well, the fiscal cliff is looming unless congress takes action to avoid it. coming up at 7:15, the number of california defense department jobs that could be lost if automatic trick -- automatic tax cuts are formed. >>> bill clinton says he's not sure if hillary clinton will run for president. she said she does not want to continue a secretary of state for president obama's second term. she said she wants to focus on issues to -- that are important to women. >>> let's see what tara is seeing on 880. >> we have a lot of traffic on pinole and then past the golden gate gate. we're in berkeley/emeryville. we have a traffic issue in here. 280, northbound towards santa clara, looking pretty bad. give y
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
today, so thank you. [applause] >> later today you can see a discussion on how u.s. debt slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to a new phase of political and economic development. event is hosted by the american enterprise institute in washington. you can see it live, 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. just the channel to the ability find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that a don't think you could have ever imagined. if you come to me and say mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or the show with the duck guy, or certain food channel network, i don't think that if i had to predetermined that was my practicum i would've ever picked that. but the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i
gets ready to step down as secretary of state. but will questions about the attack on the u.s. consulate in the libya impact her legacy? we actully keep track of how many times this kid picked his nose? hair pulls, stink eyes, man we see eveything. oh, it's the old man. hold on, i gotta send something out. you can have two apps open at the same time? how'd you do that? it's the galaxy note 10.1 man, it just does it. how do you think they made it? magic. do more with the samsung galaxy note 10.1. available at best buy and st buy mobile stores. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton says she'll implement all the changes suggested by an accountability review board in response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya. the u.s. ambassador and three others were killed. the report slammed the state department for what it called systemic failures leading up to the attack. four senior level state department officials took the hit. one resigned, the other three put on administrative leave. how does this whole thing affect her legacy especially if she decides to run for pres
to get to new details about the american doctor saved in afghanistan and the u.s. serviceman who died in the valiant rescue. >> officials confirm a member of navy s.e.a.l. team 6 the elite squad, that killed osama bin laden, died in the raid that freed the colorado man being held hostage. abc's muhammed lila has the latest. >> reporter: it happened under the cover of darkness. joint american and afghanistan special forces raid to rescue this man, dr. joseph, an american doctor working for colorado based charity morning star development. >> this is a team that has had lots of training on hostage rescues. until you get in there and do it you never know what you will find. >> reporter: here's how it went down. wednesday, joseph and two afghan colleagues were returning from a medical clinic when kidnapped at a checkpoint along the highway by armed militants. they were taken to a mountainous region, afghan captives were released, but joseph wasn't, spending three terrifying days in captivity. when u.s. intelligence showed joseph's life was in imminent danger, the military made its move. >>
service centers. they say it happened on christmas eve. now, netflix has millions of subscribers in the u.s., canada, latin america, most folks have service up and running again by christmas day, though. if they missed it going into christmas, they can watch it in the evening. one netflix official says they're looking at how to prevent something like this from happening again. >>> russia is trying to put the brakes on americans adopting russian children. and today that ban is one step closer to becoming law. d details are next. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow sta
, maryland to assist u.s. marshals who were attempting to serve an arrest warrant on an individual. once the officers got on scene and shortly thereafter, a barricade was called. >> reporter: we know that every one in the area is safe. we don't believe that the suspect at this point is holding anyone hostage. you were explaining that other people have been evacuated? >> that is correct. individuals who have been affected, who are at the target location of the apartment complex have been moved. >> reporter: there has been some communication. talk about negotiations at this point. >> negotiations are ongoing at this time in an attempt to make contact with the suspect. >> reporter: he's an armed suspect. the person is an armed suspect. we're unsure if it's a male or female. you're hoping the resolution will be a peaceful one. >> yes, ma'am. at this time the person is armed and barricaded themselves inside the apartment and we're hoping that this person through ongoing negotiations will come out peacefully and unarmed. >> reporter: one last quick question. folks will be waking up soon headin
mass murder. it would be like england banning knives after jack the ripper's killing spree. u.s. constitution allows americans the right to arm themselves, no question about that. but we can now expect president obama to get behind legislation that would limit what kind of firearms the public can buy. >> are we really prepared to say that we're powerless in the face of such carnage, that the politics are too hard? are we prepared to say that such violence visited on our children year after year after year is somehow the price of our freedom? >> the president speaking last night in newtown, connecticut. he did not specifically say he would call for stricter controls on heavy weapons like the ar 15 rifle lanza used. but it's clear he is heading in that direction. but before congress takes any action, it should study the situations in eastern europe and russia where most guns are banned. hasn't cut down on gun violence, however. as those countries have a higher murder rate than the usa. also the gun murder rate here in america has almost been cut in half in the past 20 years. talki
industries who rely on the ports, in and out of u.s. tom: what is the fight? what is the problem? >> well i think there are a number of issues that need to be discussed between the unions. we're not taking issues on any -- positions on any of the issues, everything from container royalties, to jurisdiction issues, and from management side issues with regard to work rules and efficiency, we need all rules need to be on the table and discussionsed but only the parties themselves can do what needs to be done. tom: the longshoremen seem to have a much stronger union than most. unions have seen the better days in the past, but the longshoremen, one report is they make about $125,000 on average, they have all their medical paid for. they are not normal in most labor contracts today. why are they so powerful? is it because of what can happen here as you have whole east coast, all the way around florida into houston? >> i think that is part of it, but unions have worked over the years with management on the contract, what is has been discussed and packages are between the union and management, they
found in the past that that aid is both used to feed the military and sold for hard currency. u.s. policy toward north korea hoping that north korea will give up its weapons for aid has been a failure. it's been a bipartisan failure, frankly, for decades, and it's gotten us now to this point. the hope that north korea can be induced to abandon its ambitions for nuclear weapons and missiles distracts us, north. it distracts us from pursuing the very policies that might actually change the behavior of the regime and support its people. going forward, we need to move away from an unimaginative policy here to one with energy and creativity and focus, so let's tackle north korea's illicit activities, its counterfeiting of u.s. currency. this regime will do anything for money. it is, as many north koreans will tell you, it is a gangster regime. let's interfere with those shipments and disrupt the bank accounts that are used. let's ramp up radio broadcast in the country where there is information wall that is cracking. and let's help the refugees who are literally dying to escape the pri
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
a cautionary tale. >> alisyn: and what's happening at this hour, overnight u.s. special forces operations, killing seven taliban insurgents during the rescue a kidnapped american, near the afghanistan-pakistan border, the doctor a freeman after being captured by the taliban at a medical clinic. the top commander in afghanistan, john allen, praised the forces who successfully carried out this operation. one week after the jovan belcher tragedy, an another player is dead and blame his friend. they say he was driving drunk and allegedly speeding, car hit the curb and flipped, skidded. and linebacker jerry brown was taken to a hospital and he was pronounced dead. who says no such thing as a free lunch? is the federal government giving new york schools to 30 million dollars to help school lunches and it's supposed to help hurricane sandy and it's spent on kids. the program leaves out long island and new jersey children. clayton? >> let's talk football. >> alisyn: let's do it. >> clayton: i am. it was billed as america's game yesterday. the army-navy showdown a classic. vice-president biden get
used to stimulate the brain is offering good hope to the first few surgeries in the u.s. >> we are extremely excited about the surgery, what we hope is we can improve the patient's function for an extended period of time much longer than otherwise they would have. >> reporter: experimental medications have failed to significantly slowed the debilitating disease which affects 5.4 million americans and expected to jump to 16 million by 2050. but dr. anderson says the surgery has been extremely effective in canada where it has been performed six times on patients such as this man with early alzheimers. >> if i can't remember something, if i just pause for one, two, three, seconds. it pops in. >> reporter: here is how it works, the pacemaker surgically implanted in the chest, wires are run under the skin to the skull, then deep into the brain, to deliver an electrical a rat electrical impulses a second. >> what's exciting is our understanding of how memory works fits well with how the surgery may work. >> reporter: the device is used to fight parkinson's disease. >> although the l
do. >> depositions rising in syria as the u.s. confirms its stance on political transition there. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insirsing that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. sunni any allawi, christians, kurds, druce, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> is just who is president bashar assad and how big of a threat is he to the world? here to weigh in senior fellow defense studdies lt. colonel tony shaffer. set up for the audience who is bashar assad? >> bashar assad is the former president of the syria took over in 1971. and ruled frank whether i an iron fist assad took over in. there was hope that there would be reforms and much like other dictators who come in. it's double down and continue the same policies and trends as his former -- the person he replaced. we saw this in north korea and we are seeing it again. >> talk about the latest news. there are reports that assad has weapons
and coordinate, these things like nepa, environmental permitting so that all of the federal u.s. dot agencies can serve as a one dot agency and streamline and find that the processes and environmental documents can be conned currently delivered and accepted from one agency to another. they are good at it. we have found some efficiencies and streamlining. i think we can expand that to federal rail administration and continued to great success. the other issue we have had is needing consistence guidance from federal rail on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i
. a u.s. district court ruled that the paid accuser was not credibility and ordered that the aspca to pay that fine. >>> when "news4 at 4:00" continues, a surfer's dangerous encounter with a six-foot shark that came out of the nowhere. >>> plus a chance to dance with the one and only beyonce at the super bowl, but you have to act fast. ♪ >>> and what do the top three songs of 2012 have in common? find out after the break. >>> pepsi is teaming up with beyonce to offer 100 fans a chance to dance with her at halftime during the february 3rd game in new orleans. it all starts with photos you must submit to pepsi's wreb site starting tomorrow. then they'll choose from winners from that group and those winners gets to bring a friend. submission deadline is january 11th. >>> how about videos to know if you can dance or not? >> i think i would be too nervous. >>> if you look back at the music of 2012, the song "call me maybe" is probably one of the songs we couldn't get out of our heads, but several new artists also made big impressions on the music scene. >> "billboard" magazine tracks
of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a right-to-work state means lower income. our unemployment rate is around 5% or 5.2. host: 4.5%, according to this washington times piece this morning. caller: our union membership in the state is 5.6%. so it is not very high. we have three of the poorest counties in the country, and south dakota, also. those are primarily indian reservations. without those numbers pulling the numbers down, we would be even higher
of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event, to welcome the incoming chairman, and to thank the outgoing chairman, for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the irs see that we have cultivated, which has been very rewarding for us. it is very unusual to have an event like this, with the outgoing and incoming leaders, for any organization. but the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with most other organizations. the republican study committee -- this is language from the charter. i will read it, because i think it speaks volumes about what they are trying to achieve. the committee was founded to serve as an ideological rallying point, where conservatives can stand on the basis of principle, were committed men and women without formal leadership positions can affect a change on their first state in congress, a coming up with a sound policy idea and by articulating a powerful position. it is a friendship we have cultivated for years, especially with executive director paul keller, a great
with a gun that mandatory should be 10 years. that would go a long way toward stopping gun violence in the u.s.a. you are not going to stop it completely it will always be people like mr. belcher who lose control. and you cannot disarm the entire american population to combat madness. it would be madness to even try that the past 10 years increase in the number of handguns in america. there may be 100 million of them in circulation right now. but there has been a decrease in handgun crime. 10 years ago about 7,000 handgun murders. last year the number was 6,000 it is quite understandable that people are reacting emotionally to this terrible crime in kansas city. but the problem america has is not law abiding citizens possessing weapons. that's not damaging the nation. crimes committed with handguns and out-of-control people that's what's hurting the u.s.a. you will never stop crimes of madness, you are never going to stop them like the kansas city situation. you can put violent criminals away for a long time if they use a gun during the commission of a crime. and that should be done. that's th
approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>> there are six days left until the u.s. crosses over the so-called fiscal cliff. in case washington doesn't make a deal we're doing our best to get you ready. every day we're taking a look at how the fiscal cliff if we go off the fiscal cliff how that will affect you from the increase in your tax bill to planning for your retirement. today we'll focus on your portfolio. ryan mack joins me via skype from detroit. >> good morning to you, how are you doing today? >> i'm good. you've got some advice for people to manage their portfolios, let's start with the first step you need to review your asset classes. >> there's a study in the '80s simply says over 95% of your portfolio return will determine exactly how you choose the mixture of stocks and other investments you have in your portfolio. with the assistance of a qualified adviser making sure you have the right mixture of stocks can be ever so crucial especially during the
gives u.s. smaller role." with it, mr. speaker, i'd like to submit 1 names of american service people killed recently. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. jones: mr. speaker, it's time for congress to listen to the american people and start acting on their wishes. poll after poll shows that they want to get out of afghanistan now. they want our troops home. they want to stop seeing our young men and women die. the american people want the $10 billion a month being spent in afghanistan to be spent here in america to help all our economic problems. i do not understand why we in congress seem to be without debate about this problem in afghanistan. we are currently in the process of a bilateral security agreement that will keep our troops in afghanistan for 10 years after 2014. where is the outrage by congress? we're financially broke. we complain all the time about we can't reach it had deal or that deal. we are going over the cliff, and yet our troops are dying in afghanistan and we're spending money we don't have. mr. speaker, in the article, and i quote, the afghan governm
adhered to the u.s. constitution. rep. ron paul was giving his retirement speech and to his credit, to his credit -- to me makes a lot of sense. i believe him when he says our liberties are being weakened. i am so sorry that they tried to discredit him. he makes a lot of sense. he bases his thinking on the founding fathers and their intentions. i am not very clear of the fiscal cliff. i understand that we are in trouble. the middle east situation that is going on is a can of worms. with our economic downturn, i am not so sure about that yet. even things like that mortgages, which is true. >> are you working? caller: i am unemployed, but i do? taxes. i stopped getting it in march of last year because of my health issues. >> unemployment is going to end, that is one of the expiring provisions. new castle, pa.. democratic line, jeanne. >> my main comments, i think that the problems, one of the main problems is the grover norquist pledge that the officials, mainly republicans, have taken. it should be deemed unconstitutional. no elected official should be allowed to take any kind of pledge. wh
criticizing the state department for the response to the u.s. consulate attack in libya. senator collins and lieberman released the report moments ago. the committee found militants essentially walked in because of faulty security. the report criticizes the state department for failing to sufficiently respond to requests for additional security. >> president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton are the most admired man and woman in the country according to a gallup poll. clinton topped the list for the 11th year in a row. obama is the most admired man for the fifth year in a row. >> president obama, oprah winfrey and condoleezza rice were right behind. also pilly graham and a george w. bush. >> can't go wrong with those names. >> that's a good list. >> what are we looking at going forward into the new year. >> cold, snowy. >> we are starting with temperatures going down. talking about the overnight and afternoon highs. it will be cold by midweek. so enjoy today. today will be, i think, the mildest day out of the work week. in no way will it be anything like last year on new year'
from a week in brazil. the u.s. would have just grown faster than brazil in the most recent quarter, 2.4%. i raise this because you go down there and talk to business people about why it is. we could have made little more taxes here and a little more regulation there and cost of labor there and a fair amount of uncertainty about what we'll do in the future. they have taken the steam out of it. this is a fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than layer cost and uncertainty on top of it. with that uncertainty and a very aggressive regulatory agenda which has caused uncertainty around health care costs. you add that up and you have a period in which american business is operating under a huge weight. government rates the conditions where businesses and scientists can have the freedom to get the work done. that is an important thing to think about. government can create the conditions under which the cost is listed to allow businesses to innovate. >> if i could follow up. i thought this was amazing. u.s. firms spend 36% to comply with regulation than larger firms. the small
% -- 100% of u.s. taxpayers get a tax cut. above $250,000, people making more than $250,000 a year will be asked to pay a little more to pay for the fiscal soundness of our country, to pay for our country, the support of our troops. the pillars of security for our seniors. the education of our children. for the safety of our neighborhoods. this is just asking them to pay a little bit more while they continue to get the same tax cuts that everyone does. 100% of the american people get a tax cut, the upper 2% are asked to pay a little bit more. so i thank the speaker for finally at least uttering the words on the floor of the house about what is -- what the decisions are that need to be made. again, we committed to the cut. we acted upon the entitlements. the president has more in his budget. all of this would be a down payment for as we go rward into the next session of congress to talk about tax simplification and fairness, how we can have lower rates while plugging up loopholes and having a tax code that is -- encourages growth in our country. but that's along the scussion. as we
at some of the "morning papers." "the wall street journal," the u.s. is stepping up spying on an iranian nuclear reactor, flying drones overhead to intercept cell phone calls and collect intelligence. american officials became concerned about the security of the plant's weapons-grade plutonium after fuel rods were taken out of the facility in october. >>> also from "the wall street journal," the u.s. is poised to become a leader in global energy production, largely on the strength of the domestic natural gas production. many other countries with large sources of shale are well behind the u.s. in developing their supply because of regulations and a lack of infrastructure. the result could be that the united states and canada will remain leaders in natural gas development for the better part of the next decade. >>> "the washington post," terrorists plotted to unleash a wave of attacks in aumann, jordan. during the ensuing chaos raid the u.s. embassy. this from jourdardanian authori who foiled the plot arresting 11 people. the group planned to carry out attacks with help from al qaeda in ir
, for the u.s. government, he is part of that but there are things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder. where he for instance puts a ruler, a ruler underneath a rock that talks about, that has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled. and then you are thinking, and he is making fun of his survey captains but the great thing is, we don't really know what he thought and he didn't leave much at all. >> we will be done with him for sure. >> so we will open the floor to questions. jack, what is your question? >> hi. a great talk, really enjoyed it. a two-parter. is the -- still around and the historical preservation office? >> well, the agent block is still around. where is a? there is a conference about it recently, and maybe three years ago at the india house but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time jamie kelly founded at the aquarium that robert moses was knocking down, he got it somewhere. maybe it's the historical society. i don't now remember it is but no, should have contacted them. i called the borough historian but it did not take. yea
are placed. and so when he goes out, went also then goes out on surveys for the u.s. government, he's part of that, but there's things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder, when he, for instance, put the rover, ruler underneath a rock that talks about, but has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled, and then you are thinking come he's kind of making fun of this survey. but the great thing is, we do really now what he thought. >> so, we open the floor to questions. jack, what's your question? >> hi. interesting talk, enjoyed it. is the atrium block still around? >> well, the atrium block is still around. where is it? there was a conference about it recently. maybe a few years ago. but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time kelly founded at the aquarium that robert louis was knocking down, he got it somewhere. a historical site. i don't know now where it is. i know i should have talked to them. i called the baroque historian -- borough historian. >> i want to ask a question. does every borough had a historic? >> i think so. i think there's a
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